Mar and Gar's Adventures

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Long Update

Wow, I just realized how long since I did an update. It is partially because I am getting lazy and partially not much wifi so I put it off.

I am trying to remember the order of our trip after Port Hardy. We went to Blunden for 3 nights. It was really windy in the harbor. We were anchored safely but there were white caps inside the little bay. It was pretty crazy. We got a few crab but no fish. After Blunden we had to go back to Port McNeill which I wrote about already. After there we headed over to the Broughton Archipelago and spent a couple nights at Claydon Bay. It was really quiet there. Very few boats. We had pretty successful prawning but not much good crabbing. The morning we were leaving to head to Sullivan Bay marina friends from Des Moines – Frank and Trish on the Double Eagle pulled in. They were starting their trek back toward Des Moines after making it to Port Hardy for some fishing.

We spent 3 nights at Sullivan Bay. It is really a nice marina up here and not considering the larger marinas on Vancouver Island is one of the two busiest and most successful in the Broughtons. It is a well run, clever and fun place to stay with several really nice float homes in addition to the marina. We met some really nice boaters there and ran into some friends we had not seen in many years. They do 3 dinners a week and we were lucky to get in to their prime rib night. It rained all one day so I did laundry that day. One of the really nice float houses there used to be owned by a Des Moines club member. I found out it had been sold and I met the new owners who are from Van Isle, BC, near Sydney.

After our one day of rain, we have had lots of sun again but this time of year also brings fog. After we left Sullivan Bay we decided to go into Greenway Sound and try some prawning. The marina at Greenway has been closed for years and now all of the old docks and buildings are completely gone. We were the only boat there and it took awhile to find a decent place to anchor because it is either too deep or too exposed to potential wind. We found a small good spot and spent 2 nights there. The prawns were huge! Like scampi size! But very few. In 2 days we got all of 20 so have crossed this off our list.

Leaving Greenway we tried some fishing in the fog at the entrance to Fife Sound near Booker Lagoon. As the fog slowly disappeared we were close to a rock with about 20 or so very loud and smelly Stellar sea lions. We were salmon fishing but caught a nice ling cod instead. Oh, well. And then a humpback whale surfaced near us and did a bunch of spectacular tail action over and over. It was really cool! We fished until the current was safe enough to take the narrow channel into Booker Lagoon. Just before we headed in we caught a nice coho.. yay!

We spent 2 nights in Booker anchored nicely. Gar would go out fishing in the dinghy in the fog and wind and I would stay on the big boat and relax. I had told him no more prawns, so we didn’t try there. He did catch another really nice coho.

We don’t need to be down into Desolation Sound until about the 10th so decided to try a new place as we slowly head toward Desolation. We have spent the last two nights at a small First Nation dock on Harbledown Island called New Vancouver. The proper village name is Tsadzis’nukame and is the most recent ancestral home of the Da’naxda’wx people. We took a private tour given by 26 year old Ellie. Her grandfather, who passed away 15 months ago, had been the chief. She gave us a wonderful sense of the village, their people and especially her very smart and clever grandfather. It was a thriving village from the 1890s into the 1950s but in the ’60s the government shut down the school and so many moved away and finally all left. In 1992 Chief Bill Glendale (Ellie’s grandfather) began the repatriation of the village starting from scratch. They have a replica of another previous chief’s original big house which was built all by hand in the old traditional ways. As of 3 weeks ago the village is running 100% on solar power. Before Chief Bill passed he had done research, received all permits and his vision of this project was approved. It is the first of its kind here and if successful may be expanded to other areas. This is a small village with only about 40 summer residents and 12 year round but the solar power runs their homes, power on their docks, and so far they have been really happy with it. No more noisy and smelly diesel generators running. They have a good septic system and a really good water system for their village too. As a Chief with only a 4th grade education he was a man with a vision and the ability to make things happen. If you have an opportunity to come here you won’t be disappointed. The docks are nice. Power is limited but adequate. The people are friendly and the tour is well worth it.

Yesterday a dinghy came over with a couple from a boat anchored close by that wanted to check the place out. They are from Bellevue and had seen us at Sullivan Bay. Anyway, I was doing dishes so missed the part of the conversation when the guy told Garry they had been members of our Yacht Club in the 1970s when they had a sailboat. Did Garry get their names?.. No!!!! They have a Nordic Tug now and gave us some hints on fishing in Blackfish Sound, which is about 5 miles from here. Anyway, we took the dinghy out there yesterday and while fishing and no catching we were watching 4 orcas, 1 humpback whale, many many kayakers and even many more small boats like us fishing and also like us, not catching.

So you are caught up. Garry is going out fishing this morning and then we are leaving mid day for a new location.

Oh, a technology update. The new gps for our navigation quit. I redownloaded the drivers and rebooted computer and got it back. That has happened twice now so it might be our computer giving up the ghost. Also, our radar only wants to work for about 2 hours and then it has a power failure. So……all is good but I have back up plans and everything. It is more of an annoyance than a serious problem as we are in very familiar territory.